July 11, 2017

Younger Than Yesterday

by Alan Bernheimer

Alan Bernheimer’s latest collection of poetry is The Spoonlight Institute (published by Adventures in Poetry). Recent work has appeared at Annex Press and Across the Margin and in Hambone. Born and raised in Manhattan, he has lived in the Bay Area since the 1970s. He produces a portrait gallery of poets reading on flickr. His translation of Philippe Soupault’s memoir, Lost Profiles: Memoirs of Cubism, Dada, and Surrealism was published by City Lights in 2016.

PDF - 6 MB

Alan Bernheimer’s latest collection of poetry is The Spoonlight Institute (published by Adventures in Poetry). Recent work has appeared at Annex Press and Across the Margin and in Hambone. Born and raised in Manhattan, he has lived in the Bay Area since the 1970s. He produces a portrait gallery of poets reading on flickr. His translation of Philippe Soupault’s memoir, Lost Profiles: Memoirs of Cubism, Dada, and Surrealism was published by City Lights in 2016.

Open Space is pleased to present Alan Bernheimer's Younger Than Yesterday. Much of the material in Younger Than Yesterday is culled from notebooks kept by Bernheimer in the early ’70s, when he first lived in San Francisco; a more recently composed pair of essays further reflect on that and earlier periods in his life.

It is prepared for double-sided 8.5” x 11” printing, such that you only need to choose the paper you'd like and hit print. It can be produced via a printer without double-sided capabilities by first printing all the odd pages (note that “page” here refers to a single page of the PDF, which will contain two pages of the chapbook), then reinserting the paper so that the even pages are printed on the other side.

Once printed, stack the pages. Pages 20–21 of the chapbook (i.e. page 20 of the PDF) should be facing out on top; the front and back covers (i.e. page 1 of the PDF) should begin the stack, and all other pages should proceed sequentially. Once stacked, bind as you please — long-reach staplers are an efficient means of doing so, but other methods can be found here — and then fold in half and enjoy. You are also welcome to embellish the print object as you please, for instance by printing the cover page on heavier paper stock.

If you lack access to a printer or are otherwise unable to assemble the chapbook, please contact openspace@sfmoma.org, and we’ll provide you with a sequenced/non-collated PDF for your reading convenience.

—Eds.