A slinky, waterworks, and some wires

Over at our crowd-sourced Tumblr project we are running a new experiment related to Slow Art Day, asking our fast-moving Internet audience to slow down and spend 10 uninterrupted minutes looking at something, anything, and write about it. The submissions over there are a lot of fun, and we’ll share some of them here, too. We’d love to see what you might do. Submit!

tumblr_slinky

“For #sfmomaslow I examined this slinky on my desk. A lot of the time I was thinking about how its appearance changed when viewed from different places. I imagined what it could possibly represent, being the hollow versatile object that it was. I also noted the illusions it seems to create. The front part of the spiral seemed to disappear when I was focused on the back parts.

“I also spent a lot of it thinking about time and anxiety. I kept wanting to look at my timer to see how much longer I would have to look, but I restrained myself. The 10 minutes felt more like 20. I suppose that was because I’m so used to looking at things for just a moment then moving on. With this, I realized how much more value an object as simple as a slinky could hold when inspected further. I also learned that I seem to get very anxious and uptight when I feel that I’m not being ‘productive’ or occupying myself with a more physical task.”

Full post on Tumblr –>


tumblr_waterworks

Waterworks

Me: Wow! I’m in love with steps from villa sebollini

Friend: Frankly, i didn’t understand much of this work …somehow the soul evades me…

Full post on Tumblr –>


tumblr_wires

“The slack, haphazard way they lie sprawled does something painterly: it articulates the ground plane of a carpeted office. I started to notice the tiny infrastructures of my cubicle: the lettered outlets and Ethernet docks, the color-coded casings, tucked away beyond view. They’re designed to be overlooked, but once I notice them, they assert themselves: Kelly green and dirty white, lounging in the periphery.”

Full post on Tumblr –>


Inspired to submit? Artworks count! Everyday objects count! If you want a place to start, here are some extraordinary versions of ordinary objects, from SFMOMA’s collection:

Karen Calden Fulk, Psychedelic Leather Pants, 1971

Karen Calden Fulk, Psychedelic Leather Pants, 1971

David Lewis, BeoCom 5, 2009

David Lewis, BeoCom 5, 2009

Prada, Nitry Sport, 2000

Prada, Nitry Sport, 2000

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