Archive for 2013

Happy New Year!

12.31.2013  |  By
Filed under: Back Page

12.24.2013  |  By
Filed under: Back Page

1982

12.22.2013  |  By

Rainer Werner Fassbinder finished Querelle this year, and started work on another film, this next one called Rosa L. On June 10 the script for this project, based on the life of Rosa Luxemburg, is beside him when he’s found at 3:30 a.m. by his editor and companion, Juliane Lorenz, quite dead, a cigarette still between his lips.

These are the years: 1964, 1972, 1977, 1981, 1989, and 1993, 1999, and 2003, and also the future years which do not have numbers yet, nor names, but are given all numbers and names. These are the ages of man: first cry... More

Pamela Lu on Eleanor Antin’s 100 Boots

12.19.2013  |  By
Filed under: One on One

Pamela Lu

Overheard at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

An underground chamber,
where artwork is stored in times of emergency or disrepair

Two shoes, in front of an exhibit

LEFT: Where is she?

RIGHT: Getting her priorities mixed up as usual.

LEFT: I doubt it’s as bad as all that. What’ve we got here?

RIGHT: A series of postcards, fifty-on... More

What Time Is It?

12.18.2013  |  By
Filed under: Projects/Series

This fall, Open Space has featured a series of reflections by artists, writers, and curators on “the contemporary.” Today’s piece, “What Time Is it?” is a concluding note.
In 2011′s My Common Heart, Kansas City poet Anne Boyer writes a poem titled “Questions for Poets.”  The text opens, What time is it in Sydney? What t... More

Frank Smigiel: A Producer’s Journal, or Judgment A Go-Go

12.18.2013  |  By
Filed under: 151 3rd, Field Notes

In spring 2011, Open Space hosted a series of “Shop Talk” conversations prompted by artist Stephanie Syjuco’s complex — and somewhat controversial — Shadowshop project, which included more than 200 Bay Area artists showcasing “wares” in a gift shop-style installation on SFMOMA’s fifth floor. In this essay, published earlier this y... More

Image + Text: Monica de la Torre and Abigail Child Collaborate

12.17.2013  |  By
Filed under: Projects/Series

 

Mónica de la Torre: To and No Fro is based on Luis Buñuel’s melodrama A Woman Without Love (1952), which is deemed his worst film, but is a wonderfully highbrow telenovela of sorts based on Guy de Maupassant’s novella Pierre et Jean. Its claustrophobic set designs are by the Mexican-Hungarian painter Gunther Gerzso, and the film’s c... More

Collection Rotation: Amanda Kirkhuff

12.16.2013  |  By
Filed under: 151 3rd, Projects/Series

Our regular feature Collection Rotation, in which a guest organizes a mini “exhibition” from SFMOMA’s collection works online. This fall artists with Bay Area ties take over the series. In addition to their rotations, we asked each artist to answer poet Robert Duncan’s request to students in his 1958 Workshop in Basic Techniques and provide us with a set of influences for their work — a “constellation of their genius.” Today, please welcome Amanda Kirkhuff.

I was recently invited by Open Space to ponder “the constellation of my ... More

5 Questions: Marina Eybelman

12.13.2013  |  By
Filed under: 151 3rd, Projects/Series

We’re taking our Five Questions series around the office and finding out more about SFMOMA staff members and what’s changed for them now that we’re under construction. Today we’re talking to Marina Eybelman, Technical Coordinator, in our Minna Street offices, where many of us have been located for several years and will be until 2016, when our new building opens.

Please describe your job in three sentences or less:

I provide administrative and financial support to the IT department and I am the key contact for staff wh... More

A short essay on form

12.11.2013  |  By
Filed under: Essay

A form amassing. A signal sent and received. An object for use. Form is force. Form behind. Form in a world of radical positivity. Form is leaking. Form learned from limits. Force is form. In this way, form is passive. Form is seen. Light reflects from the surface of form. Form which reforms then dissipates. Form which strikes then flees. Form whi... More

On the Contemporary: Instant Nostalgia, by Francesca Lisette

12.11.2013  |  By
Filed under: Projects/Series

This fall, Open Space has featured a series of reflections by artists, writers, and curators on “the contemporary.” Today’s piece is by British poet Francesca Lisette, who currently lives in London.

Instant Nostalgia

A couple of months ago I was in California with a friend. As we took pictures of each other in the park, he joked about the fac... More

Collection Rotation: Justin Hoover

12.09.2013  |  By
Filed under: 151 3rd, Projects/Series

In our regular feature Collection Rotation, a guest selects from SFMOMA’s collection works online. This fall artists with Bay Area ties take over the series. In addition to their rotations, we asked each artist to answer poet Robert Duncan’s request to students in his 1958 Workshop in Basic Techniques and provide us with a set of influences for... More

Inside Project Los Altos: Christian Jankowski

12.06.2013  |  By

Through March 2, 2014, SFMOMA presents newly commissioned and site-responsive projects from contemporary artists, as well as historical works and documentation, in the small suburban city of Los Altos. This Open Space series highlights artists and spaces relating to Project Los Altos through conversations with the project’s contributors and my ow... More

FIELD WORK: Juliana Spahr

12.05.2013  |  By

On the occasion of Mark di Suvero at Crissy Field, SFMOMA curator of public programs Frank Smigiel and poet and playwright Kevin Killian co-organized a small chapbook of poetry, beautifully hand-produced by Andrew Kenower and Lara Durback. We are posting selections from FIELD WORK on Open Space throughout the fall.

TRANSITORY, MOMENTARY
JULIANA SPA... More

Magic Is Everywhere: Mel Henderson (1922-2013)

12.04.2013  |  By
Filed under: 151 3rd, Back Page

In tribute to Mel Henderson (November 10, 1922–October 4, 2013).

 

“I’ve been involving myself with the landscape of San Francisco since 1969 — its abrupt geology, the beauty of its architectural geometry, and the diverse composition of its people. The city offers a lot of physical options for outside public events, especially events t... More

Diane Ward on a Stereo Daguerreotype of Artist’s Paraphernalia, by an Unknown Photographer

12.02.2013  |  By
Filed under: One on One

Diane Ward

Approximate 1850 artifice. The uses of the stereoscopic trick: you are enlisted in displacing the site of depth perception’s processing from the brain to the outside, to the modern double image. By its doubling, you are enlisted in its presence as the left image that is not-complete, the right image that is not-complete. You are also e... More

Police Eyes: A Conversation with Joshua Clover

11.29.2013  |  By
Filed under: Conversations

“Polis is eyes.” — Charles Olson

As I think I told you, I read your article “White Wigs, Black Masks: On Pop Surveillance” in The Nation and thought how good it would be to talk to the author, before glancing up to see it was written by a person I know. So I am very pleased to be able to communicate about this and thought... More

5 Questions: Jana Machin

11.29.2013  |  By
Filed under: 151 3rd, Projects/Series

We’re taking our Five Questions series around the office and finding out more about SFMOMA staff members and what’s changed for them now that we’re under construction. Today we’re talking to Jana Machin, director of SFMOMA’s MuseumStore, in the store’s temporary location on Yerba Buena Lane, where it will be unti... More

Happy Thanksgiving

11.28.2013  |  By
Filed under: 151 3rd

Field Of Disappointments / Shame On My Hands

11.26.2013  |  By
Filed under: Projects/Series

Well my fair faggots,
Here’s the last installment of my record, Cosmic Surgery. I hope when you are sitting around your Thanksgiving table this week you remember to give thanks to Dynasty Handbag’s childhood traumas for making your life so much better by the gift of music and laughter that she has blessed you with. Then say just kidding! Then go throw up all the guilty meat-eating you just did. Stay skinny!

More

Collection Rotation: Annie Albagli

11.25.2013  |  By
Filed under: 151 3rd, Projects/Series

In our regular feature Collection Rotation, a guest selects from SFMOMA’s collection works online. This fall artists with Bay Area ties take over the series. In addition to their rotations, we asked each artist to answer poet Robert Duncan’s request to students in his 1958 Workshop in Basic Techniques and provide us with a set of influences for... More

Rachel Federman: Kennedy?

11.22.2013  |  By
Filed under: 151 3rd

FIELD WORK: Frances Richard

11.21.2013  |  By

On the occasion of Mark di Suvero at Crissy Field, SFMOMA curator of public programs Frank Smigiel and poet and playwright Kevin Killian co-organized a small chapbook of poetry, beautifully hand-produced by Andrew Kenower and Lara Durback. We are posting selections from FIELD WORK on Open Space throughout the fall.

Composite Emptiness
Frances Richa... More

Never Enough of Anything!

11.20.2013  |  By
Filed under: Projects/Series

Whn ws chld w ddnt hv ngh fd. thrr ws lwys hngr.

Nw m ldr nd stll thnk thr s nt gng t b ngh, nt ngh fd, lv, mny, tm, spc. Mst lt g tht tht pttrn.

Ts f n se nw. Thr s ngh fr vryn. Ngh sn.

More

What’s At Play in the League of F.A.M.E.?

11.20.2013  |  By

Mary Anne Kluth

The League of F.A.M.E. (Fantasy Art Market Enthusiasts), just wrapping its inaugural season this month, is a participatory art project by “Commissioners” Josh Pieper and Tim Sullivan, based on fantasy sports leagues. The first season, which launched on Open Space October 1, involved nine players “drafting” rosters of any ten... More

On the Contemporary: erica kaufman, The Leaves Changed and I Didn’t Notice: 10 Jilted Starts

11.20.2013  |  By
Filed under: Projects/Series

This fall, Open Space will feature a series of reflections by artists, writers, and curators on “the contemporary.” Today’s piece is by New York–based writer and teacher erica kaufman.

the leaves changed & I didn’t notice: 10 jilted starts

for N.E. and S.W.

1.  My initial response to this question of the contemporary was to turn to Gertrude Stein and her sense of the “continuous present.” In “Composition as Explanation,” Stein writes, “the time of the composition is the time of the composition.” The contemporary is the present tense, and so our experience and knowledge is always present tense. But, I feel unsatisfied beginning here, as if it is too easy, not because Stein is easy, but because I always turn to Stein.

2.  A first few thoughts on the contemporary: the government shutdown; Dana Yahalomi’s performance work; the Stolpersteine in Berlin; the turkey found wandering around Battery Park; Nicole Eisenman’s sculptures — refiguring figures; ... More

1981

11.19.2013  |  By

AT SIXTEEN I THRASH IN SERIAL TRANSPORTATION AND THE BLEAK APARTMENTS OF FRIENDS’ OLDER BROTHERS.

A road trip to San Francisco to see Prince perform from the Controversy album. Morris Day and the Time are the opening act. The audience is 99 percent African American, and dressed to the nines. Dancing with arms thrown up; we’re in church. Our minister preaches: I’ll Jack U Off!
In May, I have my first gay sex. We warm up with vodka, orange juice, and his collection of every David Bowie video he recorded off Friday Night Videos. FNV is an ho... More

Diary of a Crazy Artist: Is Art Criticism Over?

11.18.2013  |  By
Filed under: Projects/Series

Is art criticism dead the way painting was supposed to be ten years ago?
Is art criticism helpful anymore in the age of Yelp?
Is it allowed to critique criticism?
Is a bad review helpful to anyone?
Is genuine criticism best left for the artist studio?

In a group show, why are certain artists written about and not others?
How does a jumble of words ... More

Flo Oy Wong at the Luggage Store

11.15.2013  |  By
Filed under: Field Notes

 

Flo Oy Wong: The Whole Pie opened last week at the Luggage Store Gallery.

This is a particularly appropriate venue for showcasing Wong’s work. Not only do suitcases (and other migration metaphors) play a prominent role in Wong’s oeuvre, but her ambitions as an artist-activist coincide quite precisely with the aims of the collectively ope... More

1980

11.15.2013  |  By

David Lynch’s The Elephant Man just opened at the Stockton Royal movie theater. Because you are a cool kid, and know about these things, you tell me that David Bowie played the part on stage. We love Bowie. We play your new Scary Monsters album as often as we can get away with it whenever I visit you at your home.

When asked about his directorial styling, David Lynch has more than once quoted the Beach Boys, saying, “Be true to your school.”

In 1968 Charles Manson and his followers moved from San Francisco down to LA. There, while hitchhi... More