RE:Response (PARTtwo)

July 9, 2010  |  By
Filed under: Projects/Series

Walter Kresnik “Bubble & Michael” 2010 in response to

Jeff Koons “Michael Jackson and Bubbles” 1988

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SFMOMA blog assignment ONE (part two)

An invitation was sent to a group of artists. I provided a curated list of works from SFMOMA’s permanent collection and asked each artist to make a work in response. This assignment continues my exploration as to how others interact with the museum, particularly how artists relate to works in the permanent collection.

Continue from here and view images of responses. Some works require an external link. Please click on either the artist name or the title of the piece to be directed to the response. After each response, I’ve also included a direct link back to the piece in the SFMOMA permanent collection.

For reference the following artists within the permanent collection were included in this assignment, not all were addressed, and some were chosen by multiple artists.

Tauba Auerbach, Josef Albers, John Baldessari, Louise Bourgeois, Matthew Barney, Vito Acconci, Larry Clark, Bruce Conner, Joseph Cornell, Richard Deacon, Marcel Duchamp, Willem De Kooning, Olafur Eliasson, Kota Ezawa, Luciano Fabro, Dan Flavin, Peter Fischli and David Weiss, Bill Fontana, General Idea, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Douglas Gordon, Dan Graham, Hans Hoffman, David Ireland, Donald Judd, Anish Kapoor, Ellsworth Kelly, Yves Klein, Jeff Koons, Sol LeWitt, Gordon Matta-Clark, Bruce Nauman, Robert Rauschenberg, Robert Ryman, Richard Serra, and Rirkrit Tiravanija.

This is part TWO, part ONE click HERE

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Jon Rafman “Willem de Kooning Condo” 2010 in response to

Willem de Kooning “Woman” 1950

image 2

image3

Part of the Brand New Paint Job series

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Liz Walsh “Goddess” 2010 in response to

Willem de Kooning “Woman” 1950

This is an interactive piece, please click on title for URL

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Jesse Hlebo

To Come Apart, To Become Apart, To Be Come A Part, 2010 in response to

“Splitting: Four Corners”

Three Part Digital Video

part 1 (above)

part 2

part 3

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Suzy Poling “”Channeling Tower” 2010 in response to

Dan Flavin “The Diagonal of May 25th, 1963″ 1963

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Charlene Tan in response to

Jeff Koons “Michael Jackson and Bubbles” 1988

&

Felix Gonzalez-Torres “Untitled” (America #1)” 1992

“I’m currently employed at SFMoMA as an on-call assistant media technician so I have unprecedented access to the artwork. Some of the works scare me senseless in the dark galleries because at closing time the lights get turned off when I’m turning off projectors and have to navigate around art in the dark. This is my reenactment of how Felix Gonzalez-Torres’ “Untitled” (America #1) gives off that residual colored light haze when turned off and my mental remedy to the spooky nature Jeff Koons’ Michael Jackson and Bubbles in the dark.” – Charlene Tan

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Bryan Zanisnik “322 Humphrey Street in 2010″ 2010 in response to

Gordon Matta-Clark “Splitting: Four Corners”

A nearby intersection

Houses further north on Humphrey Street

Aerial map of 322 Humphrey Street

“Splitting: Four Corners,” consists of material remnants from the building that was also used for Matta-Clark’s iconic “Splitting,” 1974, in which he carefully cut a New Jersey suburban home in half. Having grown up in New Jersey, I have long been fascinated with artists such as Matta-Clark and Robert Smithson, who used the New Jersey landscape as a source for materials, ideas and site specific projects. In his 1967 essay, “A Tour of the Monuments of Passaic, New Jersey,” Smithson famously referred to New Jersey as a landscape of holes and monumental vacancies. With these terms in mind, I visited the original site for Matta-Clark’s “Splitting.” Located at 322 Humphrey Street in Englewood, New Jersey, the site is around 30 miles north of the town in which I grew up, and an easy 45-minute drive from my current home in Brooklyn.

Upon arrival, I was not surprised to see that a new house had not been constructed on the previously suburban lot. Instead, 322 Humphrey Street and the remaining block has long since been paved and now functions as a parking lot for the nearby ‪Ermenegildo Zegna Corporation‬, a luxury Italian clothing designer. Further north on Humphrey Street there are a few remaining houses that eerily resemble Matta-Clark’s split home. The existence of these nearby, analogous homes alongside a nondescript and paved 322 Humphrey Street could not give truer meaning to Smithson’s monumental vacancies and ruins in reverse. – Bryan Zanisnik

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Brad Troemel “Open House” 2009 in response to

Gordon Matta-Clark “Splitting” 1974

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Hugh Scott Douglas “Untitled (All White Potato Stamps)” 2010 in response to

Robert Ryman “An all white painting measuring 9 1/2″ x 10″ and signed twice on the left side in white umber” 1961

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James Sterling Pitt & David Kasprzak “Richard Tuttle Sculpture Garden” 2010 in response to

Richard Tuttle

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Zachary Royer Scholtz “Opposing Mirrors with Video Monitors on Time Delay” 2010 in response to

Dan Graham “Opposing Mirrors and Video Monitors on Time Delay”

image 2

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Joel Holmberg “Take Cover Behind your Homepage” 2010 in response to

Gordon Matta-Clark “Splitting” 1974

“Drawing from Gordon Matta-Clarks oeuvre of architectural slices, this website features CNNs homepage segmented into sections and presented as a digital book. The title is drawn from an excerpt from Maurice Blanchot’s novel, Death Sentence, a scan of which occupies the site’s background.. Parallel roles of the User and Citizen emerge, creating an opportunity for the viewer to consider their place within our current topographical reality.” – Joel Holmberg

Click Title to view URL

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Guy Overfelt “Burnout on Paper No. 33″ 2010 in response to

Ellsworth Kelly “Colored Paper Images I” 1976

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constant dullaart Readymades & Suggested Domain in response to

Marcel Duchamp “Fountain” 1917/1964

Click tiles to view URLs

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Amanda Browder “Wedgie” in response to

Marcel Duchamp “Fountain” 1917/1964

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Tao Lin “Woman” in response to

Willem de Kooning “Woman” 1950

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END

1 Comment

  1. Frank Lostaunau Says:

    When can I move in to the dkooning condo? love it…

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